Revival Architecture

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revival architecture
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu Aug 15, 2019 2:59 pm
Location: Little Rock, Arkansas
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Revival Architecture

Post by revival architecture » Fri Aug 16, 2019 7:12 pm

PowerCADD was the first CAD software I learned as an intern coming out of architecture school in 1997. It was easy to learn and it did everything we needed to do as a firm to do nice drawings. Interested in historic preservation, and always inspired by great drawings done by hand, I have always tried to work in PowerCADD in a way that was as beautiful as the hand drawn stuff. Packing those sheets with great details! Since starting my own firm in 2006, I have taught others how to use PowerCADD and have emphasized the importance of good drawings, proper use of line weights. If we expect good craftsmanship on the buildings we're designing, we have to set a good example by producing beautiful drawings! PowerCADD is just the best CAD tool out there for doing this.

I still use PowerCADD to this day--hoping we will see an update soon.

Aaron C. Ruby, AIA

http://www.revivalarch.com

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Alfred Scott
Posts: 161
Joined: Wed May 29, 2019 8:47 pm
Location: Richmond, VA
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Revival Architecture

Post by Alfred Scott » Mon Aug 19, 2019 7:03 pm

Aaron,

Our daughter Sara has a degree in Historic Preservation that goes back to Mary Wingfield Scott, my father's second cousin who was a driving force for historic preservation here in Richmond, VA.

She published two books on the Architectural history of Richmond, and these are the most important books on this subject. They were published in 1941 and 1950 and the most recently published versions were actually Xerox copies of previous copies. I have brought both of these two books back as free digital downloads of interactive PDFs but with the text scanned and converted to the actual text, so you can search the text as with any book.

The books are Houses of Old Richmond (1941) and Old Richmond Neighborhoods (1950). Please find these at "Project Winkie" at

http://www.rosegill.com/ProjectWinkie/index.html

You can download these to your iPad or your computer.

I also published a book called Winkie on her, which you can find at

http://www.rosegill.com/MaryWingfieldScott/index.html

as well as recordings of her reading Diddie, Dumps & Tot and Uncle Remus. You would never recognize her voice as that of a woman.

Richmond is not Little Rock, but while you may have Johnny Cash, we had Bojangles Robinson!

Alfred

revival architecture
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu Aug 15, 2019 2:59 pm
Location: Little Rock, Arkansas
Contact:

Revival Architecture

Post by revival architecture » Tue Aug 20, 2019 8:12 pm

Alfred,

Fascinating! Thank you for the books. I have heard of Mary Wingfield Scott as a matter of fact, will definitely enjoy the read. I don't know if there's another connection here, but I currently live in Scott, Arkansas---an unincorporated area outside of Little Rock which earned its name just because the train stopped at "Scott's Station" on the land of a local landowner, Conoway Scott. I am almost sure I have heard local historians tell us that the people that settled the area in the 19th century came from North Carolina & Virginia. Scott is common name, so who knows.

Anyway, I appreciate the info.... that many of Arkansas's earliest citizens emigrated here from the east--TN, KY, VA, NC.... it is helpful to know what were preserving here, was mostly, generally, built in a way that they knew which originated in those eastern states--mostly English.

Here's a sure connection though--we've hired a consultant who lives in Richmond, will help us on a restoration in NW Arkansas very soon!

Thanks again!
Aaron

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